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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
for tax reform, grover norquist. he is the person who got some members of congress to sign a pledge to not sign taxes. a number of republicans said they are willing to vote for a tax increase. this is just under an hour. >> thank you for coming out. two weeks in a row, thank you very much for coming out and we will have another one next wednesday and we appreciate you being here. grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform. people who are following us on twitter, just tweeted, we'll take your questions. we want to thank the bank of america for supporting these series. the forum is about issues that matter most in washington. last week, how the obama campaign won and today we will talk about very important issue for conservatives and republicans, the path forward for them and their party. we appreciate bank of america's partnership including at both of the conventions. and we are going to bring you into the conversation. you got cards. we would love to take your questions and also be getting questions as they call it on "morning joe"," the twitter machine. we would love to
the politics are currently after the election. economists usually determine policy prior to tax rates. host: we are host: we are running out of time to give final thoughts as we conclude. what do you think is next on this debate? guest: we are weeks away from a deadline. an important one. where not only our tax policy is going to change but significant spending cuts are slated to take effect as well. i'm actually a little bit more concerned today than i was a day or two ago. in the sense at the moment policymakers are moving in opposite directions. in part that's the ways of washington and i think we'll see a few collapses before we ultimately get together somewhere in the days before christmas on a compromise. we have been talking about marginal tax rates, which i think are a key part not only of the budget question, but a key part of the broader economic question in terms of economic growth. and i'm hopeful that any solution that comes together is going to think a lot about economic growth and not just budgets. host: ethan? guest: i think i may be a little more hopeful than alex is. i think t
to leave the agency. with the content congressional negotiations are the sequester and tax cuts to expire at the end of the year, tonight and prime time, focusing on the beginnings of the debt of the debate on the national debt. c-span will go back to august of last year to review some of the debate and is congress is from congress and the white house to run in the passage of the budget control act. the law created the automatic spending cuts to take effect in january along with some expiring tax revisions as part of the so- called fiscal cliff. it airs tonight it it o'clock eastern-- a o'clock here on c-span. >> in january, our first week we were sworn into office, the president ask for an increase in the debt ceiling. i made clear at that time there would be no increase in the debt ceiling without significant cuts in spending and changes to the way we spend the american people's money. shortly after that, i was in new york and gave a speech and outlined i thought the spending cuts should exceed the amount of debt limit increase and there should be no taxes as part of this agreement. whe
working on the defense authorization bill. harry reid has been talking about the brugget cuts and tax increases and here he is speaking to reporters just after the caucus lunch. it's about 10 minutes. >> we are -- we had a meeting with the four leaders up here at the white house, it went very well. the problem was that was before thanksgiving. and since that time, there has been little progress with the republic carns, which is a indictment -- republicans, which is a disappointment to me. we only have a couple of weeks to get something done. we have to get away from the happy talk and start talking about specific things. and one month taxes are set to rise for all americans. we passed in the -- we passed in the senate a piece of legislation to protect people making less than $250,000 a year. we have rejected on a bipartisan basis the republicans' efforts to extend the tax cuts for everybody. those are the two majors we have dealt with on the senate floor. if we fail to reach an agreement, the average middle-class family will see their taxes go up by 2,200 a year. as i have indicated,
of millions of new jobs. millions of billions of dollars in tax revenue and make us more secure and less reliance on outsiders. it was about promoting energy. host: do you support mitt romney's bid? guest: we do not support anyone in particular at all. -- he has spoken about raising taxes sent into action. reading the best approach is to allow the developing energy resources, and from that developed vast amounts of revenue to the government. people did not realize that the industry contributed $86 million a day to the federal government. the best approach here is, let us develop the united states resources, put our people to work, create more taxpayers and in the course of that coming generate billions in need, to create trillions by 2025. that is the right policy approach. not single out an industry for punitive treatment. we pay not only our fair share, we pay more than our fair share. host: the process of extracting that natural-gas, fracking. what regulations are coming from this administration? guest: what has made it possible for us to talk about energy security -- by 2020, if we p
are entitled to tax breaks. arms manufacturers entitled to bigger contracts. the poor and the middle class, they're entitled to underemployment, foreclosures, cuts in both social security and medicare. poor and middle-class americans know all about the fiscal cliff. they've been getting pushed off it for years. with an unfair tax system, unconscionable trade deals and the fed's monetary policies. nearly 50 million people are in poverty in america. 12 million unemployed. millions more underemployed. on january 2, millions stand to lose unemployment benefits. 14 million americans' mortgages are greater than the value of their homes. on the rise massive cuts to essential services. will the american austerity replace the american dream? we need to turn back from the fiscal cliff with wealth creation, education, job creation, infrastructure rebuilding, monetary reform, trade reform, protection of social security and medicare. we need a great economic revival, not another great depression. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognize next? mr. poe: i ask
with the tax dropping 22% interval -- attacks dropping 22% in kabul. these signs of progress are real, and so are the challenges that remain. this is an insurgency that is resilient, and they will do everything they can to project an appearance of strength to the international community. the taliban claims responsibility for the troubling lies and insider attacks. they have launched a high- profile attacks, and they will continue to do that, but in the face of these tactics, they have been able to maintain strong international community and a strong commitment to finish the job. as the insurgency has been rolled back, we have vastly improved the capabilities of the afghan national security forces to maintain these gains after most of the international forces will have departed. every day, every week, every month, afghan forces are shouldering more of the burden. 2011 i believe marked an important turning point because we were able to see afghan forces become operational and take charge of security. in 2012 that process took firm hold across the country. the transition is now well under way. w
in the midwest, at what other regional issues? >> in iowa and colorado, wind energy tax credit. there was an issue that was important in both of those states. obviously models, jobs, the president jobs plan. and i think taxes. we had a fight where you had the president advocating to increase taxes on people who made more than $250,000 a year. >> looking ahead at the agenda, how big is climate energy? >> if you look at what to this country needs to do to create jobs, having a sound energy policy makes incredible sense. i think there are it a lot of voters who cared deeply about this. voters have said repeatedly this is an issue they want addressed moving forward. from an economic standpoint and for the future of the country. >> you think the president will do something dramatic? >> he has a plan to move forward. >> is the new democratic movement dead or no longer relevant? >> i think that our party has always been the big party and we have different views and that is healthy. that is exactly why i believe i am a democrat. i believe our vision of the country has a lot of people w
can get it, we have to pay for it after all. something about taxes -- taxes are extracted. usually paid voluntarily. that is an oversimplification. actually, officials at the irs will tell you well over 90% of individual taxpayers governments necessarily wrong. we all want government voluntarily and responsibly comply with tax laws. there is plenty of tax evasion out there, but most americans fulfill their responsibilities, but taxes are extracted. we have to pay for government. we, in public administration, believe in good government. the problem is, how do we maintain it would we have to criticize it all the time? how do we maintain the good parts of it? the other contribution to the decline in the prestige reagan , even of government included pro-market anti-government. by economists which were very prominent academically. reaganomics was, in a sense, invented on university campuses. the media describe themselves as a watchdog, quite appropriately. it is essential we have an aggressive news media that hold the government and other entities accountable. if they are doing things w
unpaid for wars and two unpaid for tax cuts that disproportionately benefited the wealthy. and wall street gone wild that led to the worst recession since the great depression. our budget should not be balanced on the backs of vulnerable americans, including women and children. and funding programs that assist vulnerable women and children have already experienced serious cuts in recent years and we shouldn't be asking more from these safety net programs. we also want to ensure that we don't replace sequestration, these automatic cuts that will go into place, with something even worse. some alternatives are being considered that would actually do even more harm than sequestration to women and children. and although medicaid beneficiaries are protected under sequestration, some proposals would make cuts and/or change medicaid into a block grant. that means giving just a sum of money to the states, pretty much to do what they want with, and not necessarily covering the children and poor people, poor families that need medicaid support. in the united states of america, medicaid covers
of concern about the fiscal cliff and the possibility of tax increases and cuts to government spending. host: when you look at consumer confidence and sentiment, what factors are in play? guest: a lot of times it has to do with how they feel about their own personal fan -- finances and how they feel about the job market and the prospects of finding employment or losing employment. there is a lot of concern still about the high unemployment levels but the idea that the housing market is improving and the idea that there are a lot more employers that are willing to slowly higher at this point seems to be reassuring consumers that there is some hope for the economy host: does consumer confidence have an influence on holiday spending? guest: it does to some extent. when consumers feel most constrained by their own finances, they are not willing to spend as much. a number of reports coming out in the last couple of weeks showed that despite concerns about the fiscal cliff, people are willing to spend about the same amount of money they wanted to spend last year host: this is from "the washington
to the economy if we do not extend tax cuts for the middle-class and address the other elements of the fiscal cliff and, more broadly speaking, address our long term fiscal challenges and how the economy creates jobs. we need to get this done and that is what we're working on. >> one more? >> olivier, alexis, april. >> you have said repeatedly "we" have expressed concerns? >> i would refer to the state department. >> were you for warrant that mr. mursi was going to do this? -- were you forewarned mr. morsi was going to do this? >> these are separate issues. we have raised our concerns and that, i think in party answers your question. secretary clinton is focused on working with the president down others, prime minister netanyahu, to help bring about a ceasefire and other allies can be saved and the possibility of moving forward on negotiations for more enduring peace could be realized. that was very important. the president played a very important role in that. separately, we have raised concerns about some of the decisions and declarations made on november 22nd and we continue to engage on t
to sustain our growth. it is critical step that we can take now. we have got to realign the corporate tax code. everyone agrees. we just did a survey that includes members of the general public. 70% of the general public believes we need to simplify. we cannot have the tax code that has higher rates and more complexity than anywhere else in the world. we have got to address the system that really hurts- innovation and high technology economy. we did not worry about those when we were doing well, but they are getting in the way of progress we have got to go through the process in a simpler and more logical and efficient way. this is the number one thing thousands of business people said was the biggest barrier to investing in the u.s. we have got to upgrade our infrastructure, but we have got to focus on those that are economically important. we have got to understand the things that are driving up the cost of doing business. we know what those are, but we need a plan for going forward we need to create a framework for rapidly developing and the windfall. we have a path to energy independe
circuit, as the federal court says, you can deduct it particular thing on your tax returns. and in new york, the same deduction from the same expense, you cannot. the answer has got to be the same. but we are the only court that can make it the same. no matter how peaky orgel the question might be, that is the case that we take -- how pinki pour dolle -- no matter how picky or dull a case may be, that is what we take. we cannot pick and choose. cases where an act of congress has been held unconstitutional by a lower court, we will often take back because congress ought to hear it from us rather than a lower court. not often, but it is not the amount of money involved. it is difficult to explain it. schoolchildren come by and i talk to them and they say, that is horribly wrong. sure new taken? no, in fact, in an odd way, the more clearly it is wrong, the less likely other courts are going to follow it, and the less likely we need to fix it. dealing with separations of powers, constitutionality, acts of congress, and ensuring uniformity among federal law. >> the next version has two par
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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